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August 1, 2014 / compassioninpolitics

Patriarchy Good Turns

a. Patriarchy in practice ensures the greatest comparative gender equality of any system – we solve all of their turns

(Usher 06)
David Usher (Senior Policy Analyst for the True Equality Network), “Confession of a Gay “Reverend” Reveals Goal To Replace Scripture With Street-Science,” Virtue Online. July 17, 2006. Accessed 11/28/10. http://www.virtueonline.org/portal/modules/news/print.php?storyid=4489

In practice, the existence of patriarchy in western religious societies not only ensures the greatest degree of equality between men and women, it also engenders the greatest levels of freedom, personal power, happiness, and economic progress. We can say decisively that America’s addiction to feminism has enslaved about half of men to families without giving them anything in return, left more women and children in poverty than at any other time in American history, and forced women to “do it all” as full-time mothers and workers. In-effect, we have done to over half of American men what the Taliban do to women: created an arbitrary, forceful system of family laws and policies that gives tremendous power to one sex, while leaving the other at the mercy of a tyrannical and punitive government. Restoration of patriarchy in Western cultures must begin within the major religions. We can predict America’s future if churches fail to remove radical feminist activists from positions of authority. We are only one law away from creating the feminist equivalent of a Talibanic state. Let everyone who believes in salvation begin this great healing task now.

b. Solvency is temporary – feminist liberals fail to reproduce sufficiently, ensuring patriarchy’s reemergence

(Longman and Schwartz 06)
Phillip Longman and Bernard L. Schwartz (Senior Fellow @ the New America Foundation, has written for The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times Magazine, The New Republic, and The Wall Street Journal, Former Senior Writer and Deputy Assistant Managing Editor @ US News and World Report, has won numerous awards for his business and financial writing, including UCLA’s Gerald Loeb Award, and the Top Prize for Investigative Journalism from Investigative Reports and Editors), “The Return of Patriarchy,” From the Cover of The Carnegie Foundation for International Peace’s Foreign Policy. 2006. Accessed 11/28/10. http://www.newamerica.net/index.cfm?pg=article&DocID=2912

Declining birthrates also change national temperament. In the United States, for example, the percentage of women born in the late 1930s who remained childless was near 10 percent. By comparison, nearly 20 percent of women born in the late 1950s are reaching the end of their reproductive lives without having had children. The greatly expanded childless segment of contemporary society, whose members are drawn disproportionately from the feminist and countercultural movements of the 1960s and 70s, will leave no genetic legacy. Nor will their emotional or psychological influence on the next generation compare with that of their parents. Meanwhile, single-child families are prone to extinction. A single child replaces one of his or her parents, but not both. Nor do single-child families contribute much to future population. The 17.4 percent of baby boomer women who had only one child account for a mere 7.8 percent of children born in the next generation. By contrast, nearly a quarter of the children of baby boomers descend from the mere 11 percent of baby boomer women who had four or more children. These circumstances are leading to the emergence of a new society whose members will disproportionately be descended from parents who rejected the social tendencies that once made childlessness and small families the norm. These values include an adherence to traditional, patriarchal religion, and a strong identification with one’s own folk or nation. This dynamic helps explain, for example, the gradual drift of American culture away from secular individualism and toward religious fundamentalism. Among states that voted for President George W. Bush in 2004, fertility rates are 12 percent higher than in states that voted for Sen. John Kerry. It may also help to explain the increasing popular resistance among rank-and-file Europeans to such crown jewels of secular liberalism as the European Union. It turns out that Europeans who are most likely to identify themselves as “world citizens” are also those least likely to have children. Does this mean that today’s enlightened but slow-breeding societies face extinction? Probably not, but only because they face a dramatic, demographically driven transformation of their cultures. As has happened many times before in history, it is a transformation that occurs as secular and libertarian elements in society fail to reproduce, and as people adhering to more traditional, patriarchal values inherit society by default.

A shift away from patriarchy collapses fertility rates, hegemony, and the global economy

(Longman and Schwartz 06)
Phillip Longman and Bernard L. Schwartz (Senior Fellow @ the New America Foundation, has written for The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times Magazine, The New Republic, and The Wall Street Journal, Former Senior Writer and Deputy Assistant Managing Editor @ US News and World Report, has won numerous awards for his business and financial writing, including UCLA’s Gerald Loeb Award, and the Top Prize for Investigative Journalism from Investigative Reports and Editors), “The Return of Patriarchy,” From the Cover of The Carnegie Foundation for International Peace’s Foreign Policy. 2006. Accessed 11/28/10. http://www.newamerica.net/index.cfm?pg=article&DocID=2912

Throughout the broad sweep of human history, there are many examples of people, or classes of people, who chose to avoid the costs of parenthood. Indeed, falling fertility is a recurring tendency of human civilization. Why then did humans not become extinct long ago? The short answer is patriarchy. Patriarchy does not simply mean that men rule. Indeed, it is a particular value system that not only requires men to marry but to marry a woman of proper station. It competes with many other male visions of the good life, and for that reason alone is prone to come in cycles. Yet before it degenerates, it is a cultural regime that serves to keep birthrates high among the affluent, while also maximizing parents’ investments in their children. No advanced civilization has yet learned how to endure without it. Through a process of cultural evolution, societies that adopted this particular social system—which involves far more than simple male domination—maximized their population and therefore their power, whereas those that didn’t were either overrun or absorbed. This cycle in human history may be obnoxious to the enlightened, but it is set to make a comeback. The Conservative Baby Boom The historical relation between patriarchy, population, and power has deep implications for our own time. As the United States is discovering today in Iraq, population is still power. Smart bombs, laser-guided missiles, and unmanned drones may vastly extend the violent reach of a hegemonic power. But ultimately, it is often the number of boots on the ground that changes history. Even with a fertility rate near replacement level, the United States lacks the amount of people necessary to sustain an imperial role in the world, just as Britain lost its ability to do so after its birthrates collapsed in the early 20th century. For countries such as China, Germany, Italy, Japan, and Spain, in which one-child families are now the norm, the quality of human capital may be high, but it has literally become too rare to put at risk. Falling fertility is also responsible for many financial and economic problems that dominate today’s headlines. The long-term financing of social security schemes, private pension plans, and healthcare systems has little to do with people living longer. Gains in life expectancy at older ages have actually been quite modest, and the rate of improvement in the United States has diminished for each of the last three decades. Instead, the falling ratio of workers to retirees is overwhelmingly caused by workers who were never born. As governments raise taxes on a dwindling working-age population to cover the growing burdens of supporting the elderly, young couples may conclude they are even less able to afford children than their parents were, thereby setting off a new cycle of population aging and decline

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