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November 14, 2012 / compassioninpolitics

How to stop losing when running the High Speed Rail Affirmative

How can you stop losing when running the High Speed Rail Affirmative.
1. Prepare. Fix your aff (by looking at the available impact stories and thinking about how each one might be strategic)
2. Prepare. Fix your 2ac
3. What are you losing to? Prep that. What are you not ready for that you’ve heard other novice teams run (particularly in your region)? Prep that too.

Specifically–spend time learning what the best teams in the country are saying to defend high speed rail. Admittedly not all the teams are “the best teams in the country”–but looking over what other teams are running, with emphasis on the best teams can help substantially.

For instance, even the novice teams at Woodward are running this aff. You can get the cites here.

Here are other novice teams running HSR.

You can cut a new HSR affirmative in about an hour and a half…..especially given that most all the HSR cites are from online sources. You can run the cards that the best teams in the country run on this aff.

I remember some of the best had incredible arguments around the Economy and Hegemony….which also probably leveraged well versus counterplans (ie they had really good reasons why the US federal government was key….versus states).

Also have you read at least all the tags for all the high speed rail (aff & neg) on the case list.

1. Prep out what you know what they will say (aka write frontlines and file them in an expando file)
2. Prep out what you lost to (aka write frontlines).

These simple strategies are the best way to ensure.
This is also the best way for you to get better at debate….critical thinking……strategy…..and problem-solving.
It will ultimately help you save time….when you have to write frontlines in the future.

Ideally you want to model some frontlines that you know are good. Not sure which camps put out frontlines with their affs (either for counterplans, disads, or critiques)–but you can cobble them together if you invest the time, attention….and really want to win at your next tournament.

Writing out frontlines also helps you be
1. A little more confident
2. Get on the same page with your partner (key in a cooperative/team oriented event). Its like having a playbook for basketball or football.
3. Ensure you are making the absolutely best argument (given the circumstances)

Finally, if you are losing to critiques often….you might figure out how to answer them.

I’ve included copy of the Woodward novice affirmative below (note: it doesn’t have hotlinks, like the one on the wiki does–link above. Which means its probably easier to research it from the wiki-site itself). And the following is used based on Creative Commons license & educational fair use–if someone wants me to change….(ie those who wrote it) and think I have used it here unfairly (ie its not an ego-boost of sorts)….feel free to leave a comment or otherwise contact me.

——————-

1AC Plan
The United States federal government should substantially increase its investment in a national network of inter-city high-speed passenger rail.

1AC Economic Growth Advantage

Contention 1: Economic Growth
First, government stimulus is key to economic growth—there will be no recovery without increased spending.

Stone 12 — Chad Stone, Chief Economist at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Yale University, 2012 (“Misguided Deficit and Inflation Fears Impede Economic Recovery,” Economic Intelligence—a U.S. News & World Report blog, July 12th, Available Online at http://www.usnews.com/opinion/blogs/economic-intelligence/2012/07/12/misguided-deficit-and-inflation-fears-impede-economic-recovery, Accessed 07-20-2012)
Last week’s disappointing jobs report … future when the economy is stronger.

Second, infrastructure stimulus is key to economic growth—job creation, multiplier effect, long-term productivity, and it pays for itself.
New America Foundation 10
— New America Foundation—“a nonprofit, nonpartisan public policy institute that invests in new thinkers and new ideas to address the next generation of challenges facing the United States,” 2010 (“The Case for an Infrastructure-Led Jobs and Growth Strategy,” February 23rd, Available Online at http://www.newamerica.net/publications/policy/the_case_for_an_infrastructure_led_jobs_and_growth_strategy, Accessed 06-09-2012)
As the Senate takes up a greatly scaled down $15 billion jobs bill … growth and higher tax revenues.

Third, high-speed rail provides an immediate and sustainable boost to the economy—it creates millions of jobs.
APTA 11
— The American Public Transportation Association—a nonprofit international association of 1,500 public and private member organizations, engaged in the areas of bus, paratransit, light rail, commuter rail, subways, waterborne services, and intercity and high-speed passenger rail, 2011 (“Federal Investment in High-Speed Rail Could Spur 1.3 Million Jobs,” Press Release about the report “The Case for Business Investment in High-Speed and Intercity Passenger Rail,” April 6th, Available Online at http://www.apta.com/mediacenter/pressreleases/2011/Pages/110406_HSR_Business.aspx, Accessed 08-07-2012)
The American Public Transportation Association (APTA) … infrastructure this country desperately needs.”

Independently, HSR is vital to the continued vitality of America’s mega-regions—they’re the backbone of economic growth.
Tierney 12
— Sean Tierney, Assistant Professor of Geography at the University of North Texas, holds a Ph.D. in Geography from the University of Denver, 2012 (“High-speed rail, the knowledge economy and the next growth wave,” Journal of Transport Geography, Volume 22, May, Available Online to Subscribing Institutions via ScienceDirect, p. 284-285)
On April 14, 2011, Cambridge, MA based Zipcar, … collaboration and opportunities for would-be entrepreneurs.

And, HSR is critical to the long-term growth of mega-regions—shortcomings in status quo transportation infrastructure stunt development.
Dutzik et al. 10
— Tony Dutzik, Senior Policy Analyst with Frontier Group specializing in energy, transportation, and climate policy, holds an M.A. in print journalism from Boston University and a B.S. in public service from Penn State University, et al., with Siena Kaplan, Analyst with Frontier Group, and Phineas Baxandall, Federal Tax and Budget Policy Analyst with U.S. PIRG, holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a B.A. in Economics from the College of Social Studies at Wesleyan University, 2010 (“Why Intercity Passenger Rail?,” The Right Track: Building a 21st Century High-Speed Rail System for America, Published by the U.S. PIRG Education Fund, Available Online at http://americanhsra.org/whitepapers/uspirg.pdf, Accessed 06-10-2012, p. 11-13)
Building a modern passenger rail network … of this new wave of investment.

The impact is large: economic growth is crucial to address all global challenges.
Silk 93
— Leonard Silk, Distinguished Professor of Economics at Pace University, Senior Research Fellow at the Ralph Bunche Institute on the United Nations at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and former Economics Columnist with the New York Times, 1993 (“Dangers of Slow Growth,” Foreign Affairs, Available Online to Subscribing Institutions via Lexis-Nexis)
Like the Great Depression, the current economic slump … economies and societies.

Finally, economic decline increases the risk of war—strong statistical support.
Royal 10
— Jedidiah Royal, Director of Cooperative Threat Reduction at the U.S. Department of Defense, M.Phil. Candidate at the University of New South Wales, 2010 (“Economic Integration, Economic Signalling and the Problem of Economic Crises,” Economics of War and Peace: Economic, Legal and Political Perspectives, Edited by Ben Goldsmith and Jurgen Brauer, Published by Emerald Group Publishing, ISBN 0857240048, p. 213-215)
Less intuitive is how periods of economic decline … considered ancillary to those views.

1AC Global Warming Advantage

Contention 2: Global Warming
First, global warming is real and caused by human activity—reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the transportation sector is necessary to prevent long-term climate damage.
Chapman 7
— Lee Chapman, Senior Lecturer in the School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Birmingham (UK), holds a Ph.D. from the University of Birmingham, 2007 (“Transport and climate change: a review,” Journal of Transport Geography, Volume 15, Issue 5, September, Available Online to Subscribing Institutions via ScienceDirect, p. 354-357)
Over the last century, … adapt to reduce the impacts.

Second, HSR dramatically cuts greenhouse gas emissions—the plan effectively reduces pollution from cars and planes.
Dutzik et al. 10
— Tony Dutzik, Senior Policy Analyst with Frontier Group specializing in energy, transportation, and climate policy, holds an M.A. in print journalism from Boston University and a B.S. in public service from Penn State University, et al., with Siena Kaplan, Analyst with Frontier Group, and Phineas Baxandall, Federal Tax and Budget Policy Analyst with U.S. PIRG, holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a B.A. in Economics from the College of Social Studies at Wesleyan University, 2010 (“Why Intercity Passenger Rail?,” The Right Track: Building a 21st Century High-Speed Rail System for America, Published by the U.S. PIRG Education Fund, Available Online at http://americanhsra.org/whitepapers/uspirg.pdf, Accessed 06-10-2012, p. 15-16)
Passenger rail is a cleaner form …from improving passenger rail.

Third, unchecked global warming is catastrophic—action now is needed to prevent the collapse of civilization.
Hansen 12
— James Hansen, Director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Adjunct Professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia University, holds a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Iowa, 2012 (“Game Over for the Climate,” New York Times, May 12, Available Online at http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/10/opinion/game-over-for-the-climate.html?_r=1&pagewanted=print, Accessed 08-07-2012)
Global warming isn’t a prediction…. by coming generations.

1AC Solvency
Contention Three: Solvency

First, the plan ensures effective deployment of HSR—the status quo doesn’t provide a stable federal commitment.
Dutzik et al. 10
— Tony Dutzik, Senior Policy Analyst with Frontier Group specializing in energy, transportation, and climate policy, holds an M.A. in print journalism from Boston University and a B.S. in public service from Penn State University, et al., with Siena Kaplan, Analyst with Frontier Group, and Phineas Baxandall, Federal Tax and Budget Policy Analyst with U.S. PIRG, holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a B.A. in Economics from the College of Social Studies at Wesleyan University, 2010 (“High-Speed Passenger Rail: Going From Vision to Reality,” The Right Track: Building a 21st Century High-Speed Rail System for America, Published by the U.S. PIRG Education Fund, Available Online at http://americanhsra.org/whitepapers/uspirg.pdf, Accessed 06-10-2012, p. 53-55)
Building a passenger rail network … securing a lucrative federal match.

Second, the plan attracts substantial ridership to HSR—demographic changes, trends, and international precedent.
APTA 12
— The American Public Transportation Association—a nonprofit international association of 1,500 public and private member organizations, engaged in the areas of bus, paratransit, light rail, commuter rail, subways, waterborne services, and intercity and high-speed passenger rail, 2012 (“Opportunity Cost of Inaction: High-Speed Rail and High Performance Passenger Rail in the United States,” July, Available Online at http://www.apta.com/resources/reportsandpublications/Documents/HPPR-Cost-of-Inaction.pdf, Accessed 08-07-2012, p. 21-22)
In its 2007 report to the National Surface … welcome travel option.

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